Day: March 9, 2020

Elevated liver enzymes – Mayo Clinic

Elevated liver enzymes often indicate inflammation or damage to cells in the liver. Inflamed or injured liver cells leak higher than normal amounts of certain chemicals, including liver enzymes, into the bloodstream, elevating liver enzymes on blood tests.

The elevated liver enzymes most commonly found are:

  • Alanine transaminase (ALT)
  • Aspartate transaminase (AST)
  • Alkaline phosphatase (ALP)
  • Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT)

Elevated liver enzymes might be discovered during routine blood testing. In most cases, liver enzyme levels are only mildly and temporarily elevated. Most of the time, elevated liver enzymes don’t signal a chronic, serious liver problem.

March 05, 2020
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Is Calorie Restriction the Panacea to Good Health and Longevity?

As we age, it can seem like our bodies are breaking down. We lose our hearing, our vision, our mobility, and our memory. We develop back pain, neck pain, diabetes, and depression. But one recent study, published in Cell, suggests calorie restriction is a comprehensive way to solve most aging ails.

Aging, the study’s authors say, is to blame for the functional decline of tissues in the body—a process that can be delayed, though not stopped, by caloric restriction. So the solution to aging gracefully is conceptually the same as skipping dessert, or not having that extra slice of

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Skipping Sleep to Watch Sports is The Real March Madness

News Picture: Skipping Sleep to Watch Sports is The Real March Madness

FRIDAY, March 6, 2020 (HealthDay News) — No matter whether your favorite team wins or loses, March Madness will likely put a slam dunk on your sleep habits.

For many Americans, staying up late to watch NCAA basketball tournament games is a much-anticipated annual rite. But the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) warns that those late-night games can cause problems.

“A lack of sleep can lead to trouble making decisions, solving problems, controlling emotions and more,” AASM president Dr. Kelly Carden said in an academy news release.

An AASM survey found that 58% of Americans said they stayed up

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Life after cancer: Tips for finding your new normal

At the end of treatment, many cancer survivors have mixed emotions: grateful for treatment but happy to be done; excited to move on, yet scared, worried, or anxious about the future.

Some people want to return to the life they were living the moment before their diagnosis; others reassess what’s important and what’s next. 

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) provides guidance for coping with life after cancer and staying healthy—both physically and mentally. Below are a few key takeaways to help survivors and their loved ones prepare for the next stage. 

Talk to your health care team

It’s likely that

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Germs: Understand and protect against bacteria, viruses and infection

Germs: Understand and protect against bacteria, viruses and infection

Germs — Learn how germs work and what you can do to protect yourself.

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Germs live everywhere. You can find germs (microbes) in the air; on food, plants and animals; in soil and water — and on just about every other surface, including your body.

Most germs won’t harm you. Your immune system protects you against infectious agents. However, some germs are difficult enemies because they’re constantly mutating to breach your immune system’s defenses. Knowing how germs work can increase your chances of avoiding infection.

Infectious agents:

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